The Discipline of Confession

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

selfdiagnose bcoc1 John 1:9 tells us that "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” Based on John’s connection between confession and forgiveness it would seem that the practice of confession is quite important. Thus, this week’s spiritual exercise is designed to promote the practices of confessing our sins and engaging in a self-examnation so that we can determine “whether [or not we] are in the faith” as Paul said in 2 Corinthians 13:5.

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Confession

Memorization

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

memorization bcocMemorization is an exercise in which we frequently engage our children in order to promote the retention of important information. In the church, we encourage them to memorize the books of the Bible, useful biblical information such as the Ten Commandments, and sections of Scripture such as the 23rd Psalm or the model prayer. But does memorization have a place in the life of a mature Christian? Consider the fact that when Jesus faced temptation in the wilderness (Matthew 4:1-10), He combatted each temptation by quoting from a passage of Scripture from memory (Deuteronomy 8:3; 6:13, 16). In other words, Jesus was equipped to conquer temptation in part because of the practice of memorization. This week’s spiritual exercise will engage us in the practice of memorization so that we can be equipped with a ready recollection of God’s word just like Jesus.

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Meditation

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

meditation bcocScripture indicates that our thoughts should be directed toward God. For example, we are instructed to “set [our] minds[s] on things that are above, not on things that are on earth” (Colossians 3:2)  One way in which we train ourselves to to direct our thoughts toward God is through the practice of biblical meditation, that is, reflecting on the character, nature, and commands of God through His word. The expectation of meditating on God’s word is evident in Deuteronomy 11:18 when God instructed His people to “lay up these words of mine in your heart” as well as in Psalm 1:1-2 when the author of this psalm pronounced a blessing on the individual who “meditates" on God’s law "day and night.” With such an emphasis on meditation it seems only fitting that we consider how this practice can be employed today; therefore, this week’s spiritual exercise is designed to challenge us to engage in biblical meditation either by meditating on God’s word or God’s works.

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The Discipline of Meditation

Prayer

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

prayer bcocPrayer is essential. In Scripture we are instructed to "be constant in prayer” (Romans 12:12), to “pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17), and to “continue steadfastly in prayer” (Colossians 4:22). Prayer is intended to eliminate our anxiety (Philippians 4:6), to protect us against the schemes of the devil (Ephesians 6:18), and to align our will with God’s (Matthew 6:10). With so much emphasis placed on prayer in Scripture we should constantly be looking to improve our prayer life. This week’s spiritual exercise is designed to equip us with biblically-based prayer strategies that we may have overlooked in the past.

For a .pdf version - click hereThe Discipline of Prayer